Racial/Ethnic Differences in Correspondence between Subjective Cognitive Ratings and Cognitive Impairment

TitleRacial/Ethnic Differences in Correspondence between Subjective Cognitive Ratings and Cognitive Impairment
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2022
AuthorsJang, Y, Haley, WE, Choi, E-Y, Franco, Y
JournalThe American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume30
Issue5
Pagination627-635
ISSN Number1064-7481
Keywordscognitive impairment, Dementia, Racial and ethnic minorities, Self-rated cognition
Abstract

Objectives : Responding to racial/ethnic disparities in dementia diagnosis and care, we examined the role of race/ethnicity in the correspondence between subjective and objective ratings of cognitive impairment. Our examination focused on the two types of discordance: (1) positive ratings in the presence of cognitive impairment and (2) negative ratings in the absence of cognitive impairment. Design and Participants : A cross-sectional assessment was conducted using the data from the Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol (HCAP) project, a sub-study of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Our analytic sample included 3,096 participants: 2,257 non-Hispanic Whites, 498 Blacks, and 341 Hispanics. Measurements : Discordant groups were identified based on self-ratings of cognition (positive vs. negative) and the Langa–Weir classification of cognitive impairment (normal vs. impaired). Results : Blacks and Hispanics were more prone to falsely positive perceptions of their cognitive function in the presence of cognitive impairment than non-Hispanic Whites. On the other hand, non-Hispanic Whites were more likely to manifest negative ratings even in the absence of cognitive impairment. Conclusions : Our findings demonstrate the critical role of race/ethnicity in determining discordance between subjective and objective measures of cognition and highlight the importance of a tailored effort to promote dementia diagnosis and care.

DOI10.1016/j.jagp.2021.10.015
Citation KeyJANG2021
PubMed ID34862119