Chronic Pain Among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in the United States: The Role of Everyday Discrimination and Racial/Ethnic Identity.

TitleChronic Pain Among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in the United States: The Role of Everyday Discrimination and Racial/Ethnic Identity.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsSpector, AL, Quinn, KG, Cruz-Almeida, Y, Fillingim, RB
JournalThe Journal of Pain
ISSN Number1528-8447
KeywordsChronic pain, everyday discrimination, high impact chronic pain
Abstract

Chronic pain disproportionately affects middle-aged and older adults in the United States. Everyday discrimination is associated with worse pain outcomes and is more prevalent among adults from racial/ethnic minoritized groups. Yet, there is limited evidence on relationships between everyday discrimination and chronic pain among middle-aged and older adults, as well as how discrimination and racial/ethnic identity may interact to influence this relationship. We used the 2018 Health and Retirement study to evaluate associations between exposure to everyday discrimination and odds to experience any, severe, and high-impact chronic pain among 5,314 Hispanic, non-Hispanic Black, and non-Hispanic White adults over the age of 50. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the main and interaction effects of everyday discrimination on the odds of chronic pain (any, severe, and high-impact) across racial/ethnic groups. Results showed that Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black middle-aged and older adults had a higher, unadjusted prevalence of severe and high-impact chronic pain and reported more exposure to everyday discrimination compared to non-Hispanic White middle-aged and older adults. In fully adjusted models, exposure to everyday discrimination predicted higher odds to experience each type of chronic pain. In addition, study findings showed that exposure to everyday discrimination significantly raised pain risk among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White, but not non-Hispanic Black, middle-aged, and older adults. Findings underscore the influential role of everyday discrimination on the chronic pain experiences of middle-aged and older adults, as well as differential effects across racial/ethnic groups. PERSPECTIVE: Using national data, we examined associations between discrimination and chronic pain among middle-aged and older adults, including interactions between discrimination and race/ethnicity. Exposure to discrimination predicted a higher chronic pain burden, overall. Differential effects within racial/ethnic groups underscored a need for more nuanced investigations into pain disparities among this population.

DOI10.1016/j.jpain.2023.11.022
Citation Key13651
PubMed ID38065467